Monday, December 30, 2013

Mrs. Tan Tock Seng, Death, March 1877, Singapore

The Straits Times, 31 March 1877, Page 4

The funeral of the late Mrs. Tan Tock Seng took place yesterday morning with more even than the usual pomp which the wealthy Chinese import into such ceremonies. At nine o'clock punctually, the coffin was placed in a magnificent state chair, covered with tapestry of rich silk and gold, and was carried by about forty bearers, the members of the deceased's family, dressed in sackcloth, walking after, a weird figure supposed to frighten away the evil spirits being in front of the procession. Silk banners gorgeously inscribed, numerous fife bands, gongs, and incense temples constituted the paraphernalia of the procession, which was about three miles long, and which wended its way slowly to the cemetery near the Passir Panjang Road, where it arrived at 11 o'clock, when the collosal figure in front was burnt at the foot of the grave, and the usual religious ceremonies performed. The numbers of Chinese and Malays, who attended to evince their respect for the memory of the deceased, prove the esteem with which both she, and her late benevolent husband were regarded in this colony.
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Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Anthony Aratoon, Death, 8 Oct. 1863, Penang

Pinang Gazette and Straits Chronicle, Saturday 17th October 1863, Page 2.

Death.

On the 8th Instant - Aratoon, Anthony Esq. - aged 73 years, and a resident of this Island since 1819.

Sunday, December 15, 2013

Daughter of Mrs. Agatha Elizabeth Harris, Birth 5 Sept 1836, Penang

Births.

Sept 5. At Penang, Mrs Agatha Elizabeth Harris, of a daughter.

Nov 1. At Penang, the wife of Mr. L. S. L'Fevre, of a son.

Deaths.

Oct 2. At Penang. Wm. Cox. Esq., proprietor and publisher of the Gazette, and deputy sheriff of Prince of Wales' Island.

Nov. 22. At Singapore, Capt. John Poynton, deputy master attendant at that settlement, aged 35.

Dec. 20. At Singapore, Lieut. John P. Germon, 48th regt. Madras N. I.


Source: 'May 1837' in Part II of The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register For British and Foreign India, China and Australasia. Vol XXIII - New Series. May-August, 1837. London: Wm. H. Allen and Co. 1837, incorporating Part I Journal Pages 1-304, and Part II Asiatic Intelligence & Register Pages 1-352. Page 64 of Part II.

Son of Mr.& Mrs. L. S. L'Fevre, Birth 1 Nov 1836, Penang

Births.

Sept 5. At Penang, Mrs Agatha Elizabeth Harris, of a daughter.

Nov 1. At Penang, the wife of Mr. L. S. L'Fevre, of a son.

Deaths.

Oct 2. At Penang. Wm. Cox. Esq., proprietor and publisher of the Gazette, and deputy sheriff of Prince of Wales' Island.

Nov. 22. At Singapore, Capt. John Poynton, deputy master attendant at that settlement, aged 35.

Dec. 20. At Singapore, Lieut. John P. Germon, 48th regt. Madras N. I.


Source: 'May 1837' in Part II of The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register For British and Foreign India, China and Australasia. Vol XXIII - New Series. May-August, 1837. London: Wm. H. Allen and Co. 1837, incorporating Part I Journal Pages 1-304, and Part II Asiatic Intelligence & Register Pages 1-352. Page 64 of Part II.

William Cox, Death, 2 Oct. 1836, Penang

Births.

Sept 5. At Penang, Mrs Agatha Elizabeth Harris, of a daughter.

Nov 1. At Penang, the wife of Mr. L. S. L'Fevre, of a son.

Deaths.

Oct 2. At Penang. Wm. Cox. Esq., proprietor and publisher of the Gazette, and deputy sheriff of Prince of Wales' Island.

Nov. 22. At Singapore, Capt. John Poynton, deputy master attendant at that settlement, aged 35.

Dec. 20. At Singapore, Lieut. John P. Germon, 48th regt. Madras N. I.


Source: 'May 1837' in Part II of The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register For British and Foreign India, China and Australasia. Vol XXIII - New Series. May-August, 1837. London: Wm. H. Allen and Co. 1837, incorporating Part I Journal Pages 1-304, and Part II Asiatic Intelligence & Register Pages 1-352. Page 64 of Part II.

John Poynton, Death, 22 Nov. 1836, Singapore

Births.

Sept 5. At Penang, Mrs Agatha Elizabeth Harris, of a daughter.

Nov 1. At Penang, the wife of Mr. L. S. L'Fevre, of a son.

Deaths.

Oct 2. At Penang. Wm. Cox. Esq., proprietor and publisher of the Gazette, and deputy sheriff of Prince of Wales' Island.

Nov. 22. At Singapore, Capt. John Poynton, deputy master attendant at that settlement, aged 35.

Dec. 20. At Singapore, Lieut. John P. Germon, 48th regt. Madras N. I.


Source: 'May 1837' in Part II of The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register For British and Foreign India, China and Australasia. Vol XXIII - New Series. May-August, 1837. London: Wm. H. Allen and Co. 1837, incorporating Part I Journal Pages 1-304, and Part II Asiatic Intelligence & Register Pages 1-352. Page 64 of Part II.

John P. Germon, Death, 20 Dec. 1836, Singapore

Births.

Sept 5. At Penang, Mrs Agatha Elizabeth Harris, of a daughter.

Nov 1. At Penang, the wife of Mr. L. S. L'Fevre, of a son.

Deaths.

Oct 2. At Penang. Wm. Cox. Esq., proprietor and publisher of the Gazette, and deputy sheriff of Prince of Wales' Island.

Nov. 22. At Singapore, Capt. John Poynton, deputy master attendant at that settlement, aged 35.

Dec. 20. At Singapore, Lieut. John P. Germon, 48th regt. Madras N. I.


Source: 'May 1837' in Part II of The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register For British and Foreign India, China and Australasia. Vol XXIII - New Series. May-August, 1837. London: Wm. H. Allen and Co. 1837, incorporating Part I Journal Pages 1-304, and Part II Asiatic Intelligence & Register Pages 1-352. Page 64 of Part II.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Alexander Gregory Anthony, Death, October 1933, Singapore

The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (1884-1942), 21 October 1933, Page 7

DEATH OF MR. A. G. ANTHONY
A Popular Singapore Resident

His many friends in Singapore and elsewhere in Malaya will learn with deep regret that Mr. A. G. (Alec) Anthony died at the General Hospital yesterday morning. The news will come as a shock, for although Mr. Anthony had been in poor health for a fairly long time he was out and about until only a few days ago.

Mr. Anthony was 49 years of age. The second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Anthony of Penang, Mr. Alexander Gregory Anthony was born in Penang. He came to Singapore in 1901 as an assistant in the firm of Messrs Huttenbach Brothers, subsequently reconstructed under the style of Huttenbach, Lazarus and Sons, Ltd. Mr. Anthony remained with the firm until 1925, at which time he was managing director.

From 1925, Mr. Anthony carried on business in partnership as an exchange and share broker.

For two or three years Mr. Anthony was a member of the Municipal Commission and he was also a Justice of the Peace. Of a genial and generous disposition Mr. Anthony was popular with everybody with whom he came in contact and he will be missed by all who knew him.

THE FUNERAL

The funeral of Mr. Alexander Gregory Anthony, which took place at Bidadari Cemetery yesterday, was very largely attended.

Gregory Anthony, Death January 1893,

Daily Advertiser, 6 January 1893, Page 3

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Death of Mr. Gregory Anthony.

We deeply regret to have to announce the death of Mr. Gregory Anthony, which took place suddenly on New Year's Day at a quarter to six o'clock in the evening. Mr. Anthony had been ill for some weeks, and though serious complications set in, it was not till Saturday morning that any immediate danger was anticipated. On Saturday evening he rallied, and no one who saw him on Sunday morning had any idea that his end was so near. He was conscious to the end and passed away most peacefully.

Mr. Anthony was admitted to the Bar of the Straits in December, 1876, having served his articles in the offices of Mr. Bernard Rodyk and the late Mr. I.S. Bond. Soon after his admission he joined Mr. Van Someren, but of late he practiced alone. Mr. Anthony devoted himself to the criminal branch of the law and soon obtained for himself the leading practice in the Police Courts. The natives speedily recognised his intimate knowledge of their habits and customs and wonderful acquaintance with their languages, especially Tamil, Malay and Hindustani, his quick grasp of the facts of a case and the great skill he displayed in cross-examining an untruthful witness, and readily availed themselves of his professional services. Mr. Anthony was equally successful with juries; he, soon after the opening of a case, established confidential relations with them, did not tire them out with long and useless cross-examination or by raising hopeless points of law, and when his turn came to address them, did so in terms which they easily understood, taking a practical and common sense view of the case and never asking them to believe in a defence which his experience told him was improbable. He was generally rewarded by a verdict in his favour. Emphatically an advocate for the defence, Mr. Anthony, on the few occasions that he appeared for the prosecution, conducted his case in a fair manner, laying before the magistrate or jury the facts in a dispassionate manner, in no instance unduly pressing points against a prisoner but giving due prominence to all that could be brought forward in his favour. While ever ready to avail himself of all points in favour of his client, Mr. Anthony never forgot the courtesy that was due to his opponent and scorned to profit by an unfair advantage or mean action.

Mr. Anthony was highly respected and esteemed by the other members of his profession, and his comrades will long hold his memory in affectionate regard. He will also be remembered by the other members of the European community, to many of whom his genial disposition, unfailing readiness to do a kind action and kindly demeanour greatly endeared him. The natives also held him in high respect, and were any proof required of the great esteem he was held in by the varied classes of our community, it was afforded by the numbers who attended his funeral yesterday. We must not omit to mention that a contingent of the European police volunteered to carry his coffin as a mark of respect to one who had always shewn himself their good friend, and their kind offer was gratefully accepted.The leading members of the Bar and a couple of friends acted as pall bearers.

In conclusion we beg to tender our sincere sympathy to his sorrowing brothers and sisters, and to assure them that the public of Penang mourn with them in their great loss. -Pinang Gazette.

Ms. Niven and Mr. Eben, Marriage, October 1893, Perak

Straits Times Weekly Issue, 10 October 1893, Page 4

MARRIAGE OF AN OFFICIAL

The marriage of Mr. Ebden (Collector of Land Revenue) and Miss Niven takes place in Perak today. Yesterday the bridegroom accompanied by Mr. Holmes, who actsasbest man, the Rev. Mr. Haines and Mrs. Haines, Mrs. Watkins, Messrs. Lander and French, left by the Esmeralda.

The bride will be married from the house of her sister, Mrs. Birch, and a dance will be given tonight at Taiping. The honeymoon will be spent at Kuala Kangsar, the Residency there having been placed at the disposal of the bride and bridegroom. The Selangor visitors returned by the Esmeralda on the same day.

Charles Fox Martin, Death June 1893, Taiping

The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (1884-1942), 5 June 1893, Page 4

ACCIDENT TO LIEUT. MARTIN.

Penang, June 5th, noon.

Yesterday at Taiping, Lieut. Martin, Assistant Commissioner of the Perak Sikhs, was thrown from his horse and his skull fractured. He is suffering from concussion of the brain and his condition is critical.

Lt. Charles Fox Martin, though one of the last accessions to the Perak Sikhs, has made himself exceedingly popular by his remarkable social qualities in addition to his merits as a soldier. He served in the 12th lancers as a non-commissioned officer and got his commission joining the 88th (Connaught Rangers). From this regiment he was seconded for service for five years on being appointed to the 1st Perak Sikhs. It was only the other day that he gave the Perak and Penang public a sample of his talent in things dramatic by his clever burlesque "Mr. O'Kaya of Pahang," produced with much success both at Taiping and at Penang. Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs. Martin in her anxiety at the severe accident that has befallen her husband, so widely known among his friends by the name of "Ballyhooly Junior."

Colonel Walker, who is at present in Singapore, will naturally feel much distress at the unfortunate event that will have deprived him for a time of the services of one of his best officers.

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Daily Advertiser, 12 June 1893, Page 2

Another Sad Fatal Accident In Perak.
Penang Independent, June 7.


It is with feelings of melancholy regret that the painful duty is imposed upon us of recording the death of Lieut C. F. Martin, the popular Adjutant of the 1st Perak Sikhs, than whom no man in the regiment was better liked or respected. It appears that Lieut. Martin, accompanied by Mr. Burnside, the Assistant Secretary to the Perak Government, went out to the Taiping Rifle Range, at about 5 o'clock on Sunday evening last, their purpose being to exercise their horses over the jumps. After taking a jump, Lieut. Martin's horse must have slipped, as it fell, throwing the unfortunate rider heavily upon his head. When Mr. Martin picked up, he was in an unconscious condition, and was at once conveyed to his house. Dr. Brown was immediately telegraphed for from Penang, and he as quickly responded, and all was done that medical skill and friendly aid could render, but the unfortunate gentleman never recovered consciousness, finally passing away this morning at about 8 o'clock. His funeral will take place at Taiping this afternoon.

The late Lieut. Martin was a genial friend, a pleasant companion, and a man of sterling worth and ability. He was a well known contributor, under the nom-de-plume both of "Ballyhooly" and "Sacretache" to the Indian and Straits papers, and one of the best horsemen and athletes in the East. We sincerely sympathise with his unfortunate wife in her sad bereavement and with the numerous friends who knew, liked and respected him.